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Initial research, Identifying the problem:

During our initial research about the city of Bristol and the issues in which each area holds, we concluded that homelessness along with food poverty is a great issue across the city. Thoroughly researching the varied boroughs in which the city hosted, boroughs such as; Leigh woods, Clifton, Lodge Hill, Kensington Park and Cheswick have a significantly lower poverty rate and homeless issue than opposite boroughs including those alike; Kingswood, Horfield, Bishopston, Bedminster/ Bedminster Down and Bristol City Centre, whereas homelessness was visible within the local communities. Although these varied areas are widely spread across the city and county, there are several indications supporting the presence of a North/ South divide.

Our resulting proposal, Our aims:

1.     Our proposition is to provide food to the local community, those in need, while driving a profit which will provide the budget needed to successfully operate the charity-based organisation. Identifying a secondary issue across most boroughs within the city, including those without poverty issues, litter is a nationwide issue. By bringing these two problems together, we could produce a valued cycle to bring work for the homeless while returning to the local communities in which we operate.

 

2.     Our idea is to provide work such as litter picking to those struggling with poverty within the local community, which in return will provide them with a voucher to use within a local food bank. By collecting waste from within the local areas, we would be helping to create a clean and inviting community while also being able to sell certain aspects of collected waste such as tin and class, to provide funding for the project. We hope that by doing this we will have a positive effect on the local community meanwhile setting the foundations for a successful corporate led organisation.

Our resulting proposal, Location:

1.      Our proposed location is the borough of Stokes Croft, within the city of Bristol, including the area known as lower Gloucester Road.

2.      Within the borough of Stokes Croft, Bristol the area falls into various sub divisions including those of; St Pauls, Bishopston, and Bristol City Centre.

Bristol has 42 LSOAs in the most deprived 10% in England for Multiple Deprivation. Of these 42 LSOAs, there are 26 in the most deprived 5% in England and 6 in the most deprived 1% in England (Page 2 Deprivation report)

The greatest levels of deprivation in Bristol are in Whitchurch Park, Hartcliffe, Filwood and Lawrence Hill. ‘Bishport Avenue’ (E01032514) and ‘Hareclive’ (E01014726) are both ranked in the most deprived one hundred areas in England for Multiple Deprivation in 2015. (Page 2 Deprivation report)

A greater proportion of Bristol’s population live in the most deprived areas in England in 2015 than in 2010 – 16% of Bristol’s total population live in the most deprived areas compared to 14% in 2010 – an increase of two percentage points. 22% of Bristol’s children live in the most deprived areas – an increase of three percentage points – and 14% of Bristol’s older people live in the most deprived areas – an increase of 1.8 percentage points. (Page 2 Deprivation report)

In Bristol as a whole almost 72,000 – 17% of the population – suffers from income deprivation. The proportion varies greatly across the city from as high as 49% of people living in ‘Fulford Road North’ in Hartcliffe ward to 1% of people living in ‘University Halls’ in Stoke Bishop. On a ward basis, more than a third of people are income deprived in Lawrence Hill (36%) and Filwood (35%) (Page 2 Deprivation report)

3.     The Indices of Deprivation 2015 reinforce previously identified patterns of deprivation across the city. Bristol continues to have deprivation ‘hot spots’ that are amongst some of the most deprived areas in the country yet are adjacent to some of the least deprived areas in the country.

4.     In Bristol 16% of residents – 69,000 people – live in the most deprived areas in England (ie most deprived 10%), including 17,800 children and 10,500 older people

5.     In the City of Bristol sixteen percent of residents live within some sort of deprivation, which works out to be approximately 69,000 people out of the 670,934-known residence from the 2018 estimation,17,800 being children and 10,500 adults and young adults.

Developed research, Identifying existing projects:

1.      Cluster Building:
actively using the connections made, and intelligence gathered, within Engine Shed to stimulate economic activity such as hosting, sponsoring and initiating events, supporting the local authorities, the LEP and Invest Bristol & Bath in their work and hosting national and international delegations.

2.      One B Studios
The LoveBristol Community is committed to Creativity, within the 1B studios we host desk space for graphic designers, traders, coders, app developers, computer whizzes.. hosted by the wonderful Vanilla Bear Films, who manage the space for LoveBristol. Creativity is one of our 3 core values, along with Care and Community. The 1B Studios provide desk space for startups and local artists.

3.      Love Windows Bristol
Love Windows is a not-for-profit social enterprise committed to empowering and training people who are consistently excluded from employment, due to multiple issues such as homelessness & social deprivation.

4.      Treasure Stokes Croft
Treasure is Stokes Croft’s very own boutique charity shop and community hub raising funds for the local area.  Come check out our hand-picked donated clothing, shoes and accessories plus handmade items created the the women who work and volunteer in our shop. All of the money we raise goes into a ‘Treasure Chest Fund’ that can be applied to by people and projects in the Stokes Croft area, feeding resources into the local community. We have funded local artists to do murals, educational projects with young people and even a literature festival. We also run a weekly women’s group called ‘Tea Time Thursdays’ where we enjoy a cuppa and something sweet while we do something creative and crafty or a bit of pampering. Ladies are welcome to join us from 2-4pm every Thursday.

5.      Compass Project Bristol
Compass project is a not-for-profit social enterprise founded and operated entirely by people with a history of drug/alcohol dependency and offending backgrounds. Completely changing ones life is something that takes enormous courage and heart. We are proud to be in recovery and want others to find the same joy. We raise the majority of our funds through our two 2nd hand stores and restoration workshop. All monies go back into the project to help and support our members address behavioural issues and develop core work skills. Everyone involved in the project does an honest days work at the stores on a voluntary basis to take advantage of this unique environment of shared personal experience and identification. This allows us the time we need to address the barriers we face when attempting to reintegrate society after a life-time of addiction and crime. This also allows us to develop new skills, practice old trades and gain experience and references for our eventual employment.

Identifying excising projects, Our outcomes:

1.     Similar projects have been successfully completed in various locations across Europe, with disposal points located in shops and the sides of public spaces. Card systems are in use to identify the users and help to keep a record of the usage and identifiable identity of users.

Recycle for Scotland is also currently piloting the idea through specified points In the country. Recycle and Reward trials are underway across Scotland where you can get incentives like money back, or discount vouchers for returning empty bottles and cans, safe in the knowledge that all items collected will be sent for recycling.Last year the Scottish Government made a commitment to pilot incentivised recycling systems for single use plastic, glass and aluminium containers in Scotland.

So far the Scottish scheme is proving popular and gives a reason for those to recycle and is gaining public commitment to the scheme. Vouchers are currently being issued for users to use in store at Ikea, for waste to be returned to disposal points across the country.

At the universities, use of the Recycle and Reward machines increased (more than doubling at HeriotWatt University, for example) once the new term had begun in September, building over freshers’ week as more students presumably became more aware of the machines and their benefits. Subsequent monitoring conducted by Zero Waste Scotland shows that this increase was largely sustained for the remainder of the autumn term at Heriot-Watt (with rates consistently exceeding the late term-time levels of May). Figure 2 shows performance for the entire period monitored. The average rate per student/staff member during the SKM pilot period therefore underestimates the real rate and the full potential demonstrated during the new term.

Recycling factors, prices and outcomes:

While the main aim of our project is allowing an easy to access opportunity for those in need, the charity needs an income to operate the project. Food to be distributed from our food bank, will be donated from local Tesco International Ltd, stores through their charity, Fare Share, while also working alongside various different companies to sell on valuable waste materials collected.

While typical household waste contains large quantities of unusable waste, and needs to be sent to landfill, typically waste left across local streets include items which can be recycled or upcycled, further looking into the development of recycling street waste the following shows the typical price per item when sold:

Performance programs/ Football programs sold for an average £3.50 per item, with an estimated 81,100 bundles sold within the last three months.

Shirt buttons sold for an average£2.47 per item, with an estimated 1,243 bundles sold within the last three months.

Coat hangers sold for an average £2.02 per item, with an estimated 2,298 bundles sold within the last three months.

Empty perfume bottles sold for an average £3.97 per item, with an estimated 1,986 bundles sold within the last three months.

glass jars/ glass bottles sold for an average £2.42 per item, with an estimated 2,485 bundles sold within the last three months.

Instagram, market research:

Taking to Instagram, we opened a survey asking various questions, from whether people agreed with our research, to what they would do if they were in the position of our target audience. The results are as follows:

Would you agree that poverty is an issue within central Bristol?
83% of 33 people surveyed answered yes.

Would you agree litter is an issue within central Bristol?
81% of 29 people surveyed answered yes.

Do you agree those living in poverty would work if free opportunities were easily accessible to them?
77% of 28 people surveyed answered yes.

Would recycling street litter for vouchers/ tender interest you in your current situation?
54% of 27 people surveyed answered yes.

Would recycling street litter for vouchers/ tender interest you if you were homeless or suffering from poverty?
75% of 26 people surveyed answered yes.

Instagram, market research:

Our resulting proposal, Manifesto:

1.     Our proposition is to provide food to the local community, those in need, while driving a profit which will provide the budget needed to successfully operate the charity-based organisation. Identifying a secondary issue across most boroughs within the city, including those without poverty issues, litter is a nationwide issue. By bringing these two problems together, we could produce a valued cycle to bring work for the homeless while returning to the local communities in which we operate.

2.     Our idea is to provide work such as litter picking to those struggling with poverty within the local community, which in return will provide them with a voucher to use within a local food bank. By collecting waste from within the local areas, we would be helping to create a clean and inviting community while also being able to sell certain aspects of collected waste such as tin and class, to provide funding for the project. We hope that by doing this we will have a positive effect on the local community meanwhile setting the foundations for a successful corporate led organisation.

Our manifesto, what we wish to achieve:

1.     To create a unique and independent charity.

2.     To inspire the local community.

3.     To drastically reduce poverty in local areas.

4.     To eliminate food poverty on local streets.

5.     To operate a viable charity with enough earnings to run the organisation.

Our manifesto, what we wish to achieve:

Project branding, Logo design:

1.     Our proposition is to provide food to the local community, those in need, while also producing a logo which is unique, we also wanted a strong sense of charity work, along with a clean and modern style.

2.     By experimenting with different design ideas, shapes and themes, we produced a shortlist of logo designs which we could take forward within our project.

3.     Based upon our initial design ideas, we chose to use a series of pastel colours within our design, as we felt these were calming and welcoming colours. We opted for a logo design in which was clean and welcoming while also easily identifiable and able to work with in various different formats.

Project branding, Final logo:

1.     While our organisation is targeted towards anybody which is struggling with poverty in the Bristol areas, we are also aware that a large percentage of our audience may be sleeping rough or on the streets, therefor we had to create an easily accessible way of advertising and reaching our audience.

2. While our organisation is targeted towards anybody which is struggling with poverty in the Bristol areas, we are also aware that a large percentage of our audience may be sleeping rough or on the streets, therefor we had to create an easily accessible way of advertising and reaching our audience.

Project branding, Final logo:
Results